Bringing Kashema Hutchinson’s Hip-Hop Pedagogy into the Early American Lit Survey

As a sound studies scholar, I am always looking for ways to bring sound into my classroom. I play recordings of wild birds, amphibians, and other animals for my students when we read early American authors writing about the "howling" wilderness, about dangerous adventures into the forest where goblins and witches seduce wandering souls into … Continue reading Bringing Kashema Hutchinson’s Hip-Hop Pedagogy into the Early American Lit Survey

What Do Our Students Lose by Not Taking Humanities Courses?

In the latest issue of MLA's Profession, Cathy N. Davidson and I argue that students lose too much when they don't take humanities courses and that now is the time for those of us teaching in the humanities to do more than take a defensive posture in what amounts to a global assault on the … Continue reading What Do Our Students Lose by Not Taking Humanities Courses?

Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

This is the third post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in your classroom to put that theory into practice. To read the original post, published on March 4, 2019 on HASTAC.org, click here. bell hooks … Continue reading Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

This is the second post in a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. Click here to read the original post, published on February 19, 2019 on HASTAC.org. In Freire for the Classroom, Ira Shor … Continue reading Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

This is the first post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. View the original post, published on February 18, 2019 on HASTAC.org. Paulo Freire in Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) advocates … Continue reading Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

This post was originally published on HASTAC.org on December 14, 2018 in the Progressive Pedagogy Group. Read the original post here. In addition to asking for course evaluations from my students (and Cathy N. Davidson has a great template and post about "Building a Better Course Evaluation Form"), and in addition to cautioning my students against gender … Continue reading End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

I've learned a great deal from Kahdeidra Monét Martin, a Graduate Center and Humanities Alliance Fellow I've had the pleasure of meeting at Futures Initiative events and a recent Hunter College ACERT luncheon. Kahdeidra reminded me, on our recent panel together, that just because we grow older doesn't mean that the learning methods we associate … Continue reading Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Earlier in the semester, I wrote a post about Structuring Equality in my early American Lit classroom. On the first day of class, I asked my students (individually and then in pairs, using Think-Pair-Share) to determine their goals and priorities for the year. Then, in larger groups, students revised and added to parts of the … Continue reading A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Strategies for Time Management

[Originally posted on futuresinitiative.org on October 14, 2018] During a recent business meeting at the Futures Initiative, we spent 15-20 minutes sharing strategies for time management in a fishbowl activity. There are different ways to do a fishbowl: you can divide a class into discussants and listeners, where groups sit in different spaces in the room; or … Continue reading Strategies for Time Management

Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit

I'm a 19th-century Americanist and my syllabi for courses taught in early American lit have covered a wide span of women's literature. I've always gone for non-canonical authors and approaches that critique a male-dominated, colonialist canon. But aside from teaching the usual suspects, slave narratives such as Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave … Continue reading Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit