Bringing Kashema Hutchinson’s Hip-Hop Pedagogy into the Early American Lit Survey

As a sound studies scholar, I am always looking for ways to bring sound into my classroom. I play recordings of wild birds, amphibians, and other animals for my students when we read early American authors writing about the "howling" wilderness, about dangerous adventures into the forest where goblins and witches seduce wandering souls into … Continue reading Bringing Kashema Hutchinson’s Hip-Hop Pedagogy into the Early American Lit Survey

Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit

I'm a 19th-century Americanist and my syllabi for courses taught in early American lit have covered a wide span of women's literature. I've always gone for non-canonical authors and approaches that critique a male-dominated, colonialist canon. But aside from teaching the usual suspects, slave narratives such as Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave … Continue reading Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit

How do we write at the intersection of race and gender?

My 8am class has turned into a hotbed of burning questions and research. How this happened since my last post about the grueling 8am time slot, I can barely tell... but I think it started when I canceled the reading for a day and assigned my students debate roles as "administrators" and "English faculty," tasking them with … Continue reading How do we write at the intersection of race and gender?