Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

This is the third post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in your classroom to put that theory into practice. To read the original post, published on March 4, 2019 on HASTAC.org, click here. bell hooks … Continue reading Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

This is the second post in a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. Click here to read the original post, published on February 19, 2019 on HASTAC.org. In Freire for the Classroom, Ira Shor … Continue reading Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

This is the first post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. View the original post, published on February 18, 2019 on HASTAC.org. Paulo Freire in Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) advocates … Continue reading Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

This post was originally published on HASTAC.org on December 14, 2018 in the Progressive Pedagogy Group. Read the original post here. In addition to asking for course evaluations from my students (and Cathy N. Davidson has a great template and post about "Building a Better Course Evaluation Form"), and in addition to cautioning my students against gender … Continue reading End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

I've learned a great deal from Kahdeidra Monét Martin, a Graduate Center and Humanities Alliance Fellow I've had the pleasure of meeting at Futures Initiative events and a recent Hunter College ACERT luncheon. Kahdeidra reminded me, on our recent panel together, that just because we grow older doesn't mean that the learning methods we associate … Continue reading Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Earlier in the semester, I wrote a post about Structuring Equality in my early American Lit classroom. On the first day of class, I asked my students (individually and then in pairs, using Think-Pair-Share) to determine their goals and priorities for the year. Then, in larger groups, students revised and added to parts of the … Continue reading A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Structuring Equality in my American Literature Survey Course

It's syllabus-writing season! After some time away from teaching, time for reflection and growth as an educator, I am thrilled to be teaching "American Literature: Origins to the Civil War" again this fall. I've taught this course twice, so I feel confident enough to hand my syllabus over to my students to plan all the … Continue reading Structuring Equality in my American Literature Survey Course

Revolutionary Office Meetings

[Originally posted on May 24, 2018 on futuresinitiative.org, and featured in "Better Meetings Through Pedagogy" by ProfHacker, The Chronicle of Higher Education.] Pedagogy is something we take with us when we leave a classroom, and it’s something (as I learned this year at the Futures Initiative) that we can bring into office meetings to make … Continue reading Revolutionary Office Meetings

Gantt Charts, or What Academics Can Learn From Project Managers, Part I

When I met with a colleague to talk about her Orals, she very kindly told me she had no idea how I managed all of the things that I do. I admitted that sometimes I only just barely manage to do them, and I said exactly the same thing to her. We both juggle multiple … Continue reading Gantt Charts, or What Academics Can Learn From Project Managers, Part I

What I Wish I Knew Before Starting my PhD

Now in my fifth year, writing my dissertation, I've had some time to reflect on my beginnings as a PhD student and the years preceding it when I was getting my Masters. I've attended the same institution for 7 years and watched it change for 9 (I took a 2-year break between degrees). I've realized … Continue reading What I Wish I Knew Before Starting my PhD