STAR Method, or What Academics Can Learn from Project Managers, Part II

In a previous post, I talked about using Gantt Charts to map out dissertation timelines and estimate how long it will take you to meet short and long-term goals. All of that I learned from my fiancé, who works in a world of glass skyscrapers far different from mine. Over the past two and a … Continue reading STAR Method, or What Academics Can Learn from Project Managers, Part II

Revolutionary Office Meetings

[Originally posted on May 24, 2018 on futuresinitiative.org, and featured in "Better Meetings Through Pedagogy" by ProfHacker, The Chronicle of Higher Education.] Pedagogy is something we take with us when we leave a classroom, and it’s something (as I learned this year at the Futures Initiative) that we can bring into office meetings to make … Continue reading Revolutionary Office Meetings

Gantt Charts, or What Academics Can Learn From Project Managers, Part I

When I met with a colleague to talk about her Orals, she very kindly told me she had no idea how I managed all of the things that I do. I admitted that sometimes I only just barely manage to do them, and I said exactly the same thing to her. We both juggle multiple … Continue reading Gantt Charts, or What Academics Can Learn From Project Managers, Part I

What Hiking Taught Me About Writing the Dissertation

It's March and it's snowing on top of the springtime buds (because March) and I'm getting that familiar itch telling me that it's time to go for another very long walk outside. Over the past two summers, I've completed two long section hikes (400 and 500 miles) of the Appalachian Trail (A.T.) and I'm ready … Continue reading What Hiking Taught Me About Writing the Dissertation

What I Wish I Knew Before Starting my PhD

Now in my fifth year, writing my dissertation, I've had some time to reflect on my beginnings as a PhD student and the years preceding it when I was getting my Masters. I've attended the same institution for 7 years and watched it change for 9 (I took a 2-year break between degrees). I've realized … Continue reading What I Wish I Knew Before Starting my PhD

Reading Reflections vs. Midterm Papers

As you plan your syllabus for the next semester, consider assigning reading reflections instead of a midterm paper. A reflection is "a pause," as PALS contributor Corinna Cook writes, "it involves turning to look back, and to reconsider something thought or done in the past from the perspective of the present." In my experience, a … Continue reading Reading Reflections vs. Midterm Papers

Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit

I'm a 19th-century Americanist and my syllabi for courses taught in early American lit have covered a wide span of women's literature. I've always gone for non-canonical authors and approaches that critique a male-dominated, colonialist canon. But aside from teaching the usual suspects, slave narratives such as Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave … Continue reading Teaching LEMONADE in 19th-Century American Lit

How do we write at the intersection of race and gender?

My 8am class has turned into a hotbed of burning questions and research. How this happened since my last post about the grueling 8am time slot, I can barely tell... but I think it started when I canceled the reading for a day and assigned my students debate roles as "administrators" and "English faculty," tasking them with … Continue reading How do we write at the intersection of race and gender?

In Your Lecture, Research Together

As I've mentioned in previous blog posts, my 8 a.m. class this semester has been a challenge but by now (two months into the semester) my students have grown accustomed to me throwing questions like "Is feminism a privilege?" at them at 8:10 a.m. They talk in their listening dyad activity for two minutes each, … Continue reading In Your Lecture, Research Together