Time Management in Class: What You (and Students) Can Do

Time seems to melt away as soon as class begins. There is so much material to cover and never enough time. I feel this way especially when teaching a survey course. And there's always less time than a full class period: the first five minutes are for settling in, announcements, attendance, and in the last … Continue reading Time Management in Class: What You (and Students) Can Do

Leading Workshops with Active Learning Methods

The tools that we use in the classroom often can be used in other settings, both on and off campus: department or community meetings, board meetings, workshops, and even in conference presentations. Recently, I had the pleasure of organizing an event that was part of the University Worth Fighting For series at the CUNY Graduate … Continue reading Leading Workshops with Active Learning Methods

Fold/Unfold Close Reading Activity

This post is a modified version of "Unfolding Fanny Fern's Ruth Hall and Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'The Birthmark'," a paper I presented at the American Literature Association conference in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 23, 2019. To unfold something is to open or unwrap, attempt to undo its folds. However, a fold can’t really be undone: when … Continue reading Fold/Unfold Close Reading Activity

Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

This is the third post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in your classroom to put that theory into practice. To read the original post, published on March 4, 2019 on HASTAC.org, click here. bell hooks … Continue reading Entry & Exit Tickets: A Way to Share in the Intellectual Growth of Students

Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

This is the second post in a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. Click here to read the original post, published on February 19, 2019 on HASTAC.org. In Freire for the Classroom, Ira Shor … Continue reading Writing Learning Outcomes with Your Students

Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

This is the first post of a series on Progressive Pedagogy in which I very briefly summarize a pedagogical theory and offer an exercise (or two) that you can use in a classroom to put that theory into practice. View the original post, published on February 18, 2019 on HASTAC.org. Paulo Freire in Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970) advocates … Continue reading Dialogic Methods in the Classroom

End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

This post was originally published on HASTAC.org on December 14, 2018 in the Progressive Pedagogy Group. Read the original post here. In addition to asking for course evaluations from my students (and Cathy N. Davidson has a great template and post about "Building a Better Course Evaluation Form"), and in addition to cautioning my students against gender … Continue reading End-of-Term Evaluations are Learning Opportunities

Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

I've learned a great deal from Kahdeidra Monét Martin, a Graduate Center and Humanities Alliance Fellow I've had the pleasure of meeting at Futures Initiative events and a recent Hunter College ACERT luncheon. Kahdeidra reminded me, on our recent panel together, that just because we grow older doesn't mean that the learning methods we associate … Continue reading Tactile Learning in the College Classroom

A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Earlier in the semester, I wrote a post about Structuring Equality in my early American Lit classroom. On the first day of class, I asked my students (individually and then in pairs, using Think-Pair-Share) to determine their goals and priorities for the year. Then, in larger groups, students revised and added to parts of the … Continue reading A Lesson Plan for Democratic Co-Creation: Forging a Syllabus by Students, for Students

Strategies for Time Management

[Originally posted on futuresinitiative.org on October 14, 2018] During a recent business meeting at the Futures Initiative, we spent 15-20 minutes sharing strategies for time management in a fishbowl activity. There are different ways to do a fishbowl: you can divide a class into discussants and listeners, where groups sit in different spaces in the room; or … Continue reading Strategies for Time Management